Jareth – Sculpture Project – The Hair

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As I got further on with my Sculpture of Jareth, I was nearing the end of the face and clothing, not finished, but getting there, and I was starting to look at the next stage – the hair. I had a quick look on the internet and was perturbed with some of my search results.

the face is amazing, it’s a great David Bowie face, but it’s not Jareth, you know… and the hair.. not quite right…

 

these guys took the use real hair route and the full model has fantastic attitude, but the hair isn’t sculpted

The colour and the detail on the clothes look fantastic, the face is not really Bowie but I don’t know what MacFarlane were thinking when they made this hair

This is quite a nice plaque, doesn’t look like Jareth at all, looks more like younger Bowie to be honest  – (actually if you look on the site this sculptor has obviously got one David Bowie face that he casts and put slightly different hair and accessories on) and the hair is just not quite right…

ok, this has started to get a little weird, again the face has got it, but the hair, who have they borrowed that from?

So after looking around and not finding anything I liked, or could even start to base my hair on, my next step filled me with quite a lot of intrepidation.

In reality I actually put my model to one side and just looked at it for a whole week, not knowing how to progress.

—————————————————————————————————————————–

After looking at my model under it’s safety plastic covering for a week or so and not finding any inspiration (see above), or technique I could use to get how I saw the hair for this model right, I just had to try.

So I thought I would test some ideas, and see how it worked within the Monster Clay, keeping in the back of my mind that I could just take it all off if it went terribly wrong…

At first I tried rolling little strands and trying to apply those, but it looked more like dreads than the short long hair combo that was the actual wig for Jareth.

I took those off.

Then I tried rolling flat bits and cutting through them, thinking I could apply them in semi circles at different layers round the back of the head, but that didn’t work either…

More hair removal, back to baldy Bowie again!

Then I tried to scratch into the surface of rolled and slightly flattened pieces, I thought this might work, so started to layer up on one side, but after consideration I felt this was not right. too chunky, no fineness to the strands.

Everybody off!

It needed more life, more ‘poof’, less heaviness.

I started to just add and push back with the wax carving tools, just to pull at the once again softened clay and add those bits on, a bit like adding leaves and then pushing back into the soft and thinned edges, this was better..

Still quite heavy but I liked the texture and different levels/layers.

Then I tried adding longer strands and slightly flattened but slimmer pieces…

Back to the reference as much as possible for this bit

I am pleased with the heavily textured back area and adding in the thin trails or strands is working for me.

It’s still a little too heavy in the body of the hair, but I’m a bit stuck as to how to fix that… The fringe at the front is too chunky, but I’m going to leave it to harden up and see if I can work out how to thin it down without making it really straggly. I’m very aware that after my googling similar sculptures the hair is the hardest thing to get right.

I am also going to remove the eye beads and sculpt the orbit of the eye in clay.

The skin needs work, but again I’m not sure how to get a nice finish on it, if I blow-torch it, it just looks shiny and can melt quite easily.

The collar also needs more attention but I need to look at being careful with the finish, so a bit more research into this before the next stage.

Really useful sculpting Videos on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4waaHk-gI8_dzywddif1hQ7z-6eDa-Ro

(Polymer Clay is quite close to Monster Clay) and this guys tutorials are really good.

to be continued…

Jareth – Sculpture project

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Ever since I got back from my Model making course at Pinewood Studios (sounds so fancy doesn’t it) I have wanted to do a bit more sculpture, if I lived in a perfect world I’d work on massive sculptures, but I just don’t have the room or resources to do that.

But what to sculpt… I love David Bowie, one of my all time favourite films is Labyrinth, and the title of this blog post kind of gives it away, so I decided to try making a Jareth bust. I had managed to source some Monster Clay a little while after my course, but not done to much with it, although I loved the fact I could just restart and go again…

I had started to sculpt my whole fantastical animal in Monster Clay, but I then decided I wanted to make it as a proper stop-motion puppet (another blog needed for that!).

Then I kept seeing this super curvy lady who had an incredibly tiny waist, so I started to sculpt her with the intention of casting the ‘underbody’ of another stop-mo puppet in foam from it, but I could never re-create her incredible figure.

So unhappy with them both, they spent some time in plastic and I am now deconstructing them.

Putting the plastic on, keeps dust and muck out of the Clay

But I found it a useful process to actually work with the Monster Clay,

I didn’t have a hot gun, or blow torch and trying to warm the surface of the Clay up with a normal hairdryer was not successful, but worst of all it kept blowing everything on my desk about. I don’t have a sculpture studio so found this quite maddening to use. I also found that my tools were somewhat lacking, so these sculpts got mothballed whilst normal life carried on.

Then Covid 19 hit.

Sat at my homedesk a lot more, I started to look up Monster Clay techniques, tools and tutorials. I discovered that Francesco (tutor on the prop modelling course) was doing Monster Clay lives on Twitch, so sat watching those, alongside other YouTube videos for good research before I got started.

And eventually got down to making the armature for my Jareth.

Carving some foam to make filler for the head

Hot gluing the foam head former onto the wire and baseboard

adding foil to pad the shoulders

So using the foam and foil on the wire is just to bulk out the inner of the model, it makes it lighter and cheaper than working on a solid block of Monster Clay.

I had already made a moodboard of images from the film, showing hair, face and profile, and choosing which ‘Jareth’ costume I would be trying to create. (top left)

Bowie – Jareth Moodboard from various stills and promo images

To get the clay super soft and mouldable, I heated the large tub in the Microwave (it’s non toxic) and then started to add substance to the skeleton.

you can see how warm the clay is at it looks quite shiny at this stage, I was just using a plastic loop tool to pull the soft clay out of the tub.

Clay Loop & Ribbon Tools - The Compleat Sculptor

loop tool – mine was a plastic one found at my local craft store

Then I needed a little more precision to try and get some basic facial structures in place, for this I was using my Christmas Present of metal carving tools…

12PC-WAX-CLAY-SOAP-CARVER-POTTERY-CRAFT-TOOL-SET-MODELLING-CARVING-SCULPTING

12 piece Wax/Clay carving set

trying to get the brow shape and frown right for my chosen image

Making sure to keep checking my reference images I then worked on the mouth and a little more work on the nose and brow, looking at it from all angles…

From some angles I was really pleased with it, but I was starting to want some better tools, finer with more precision, the metal ones I was using to carve with just weren’t fine enough, I also wanted some of the really small tools, like mini loop tools that I had seen quite a few of the online tutorials were using.

I started to look, but wasn’t having any luck until I discovered they are actually called Sgraffitto tools, used for making intricate patterns, traditionally on clay pots.

I bought these online/ebay because they were the closest to what I was after before I discovered Sgraffitto!

And whilst on Ebay I bought myself a chef’s blowtorch too, just make sure you have the right gas/fuel to go in it as they don’t like to sell the little ones with gas ready to go!

So with newly acquired tools, I continued on, and for some reason decided that I would add in some glass eyes as I was finding it tricky to make the eyes look ok, just in Monster Clay.

Adding in Glass eyes

I didn’t want to fiddle too much more with the face, I was fairly happy, so moved onto making the elaborate collar. Monster Clay came into it’s own for this.. one of the qualities of Monster Clay is that it can be totally molten and then ten minutes later, quite solid and rigid, so I only needed to prop the collar for a little while until it held it’s own weight.

I rolled out a piece of clay on a board and shaped/cut it to size whilst it was soft and flexible, trying it in position and adjusting and then as it hardened applied it onto the shoulders with more of the very soft clay

It wasn’t until I re-watched the film and kept rewinding and forwarding that I realised that the collar is even more elaborate than I thought, so I need to add another point here and it looks like bones hold it up in the film… more work to be done!

My working desk

Adding details to the chest area, such as clothing, and refining the collar

I think my most used tool is my retractable craft knife I’m finding it amazing to be able to really carve with it on the Monster Clay (once it’s set really hard of course).

Up to this point I’ve been quite happy, finding that I’m managing now I have most of the tools to hand.

I even find some websites on how to make my own Sgraffitto tools, awesome! I’m still watching and trying to learn though, I’m not quite sure how to get the right texture/finish on the face, but I’m enjoying the process.

But now I’ve got to think about the hair….

TV Paint and After Effects

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Teaching TV Paint to the Students at NUA is quite a change from any of the Adobe products, it’s a bit of a lore unto itself. No keyboard shortcuts are the same – I tell a lie, ctrl z!

None of the students have com across this type of software before so it really makes sense to give them a very basic but practical introduction, that being said, I am not a natural 2D animator, my Graphic Design and Illustrator background means I usually like crisp lines, clean colours and none of this sketchy stuff, which is the way I actually draw!

Below video test was my first foray into TVP from simple footage that I shot in the garden and it just  turned out really well, really gorgeous movement.

I had also recently mocked up a lip sync/rotoscope sequence with a freelance client so had got the basics of using video in TV Paint (massive files!) down and I really love to push and expand software in different combinations.

just the lines

just the lines

colour blocking

colour blocking

Below final output video –

So, to really get my teeth into it I gave myself an extension project… let’s take the output from TVP and play with it in After Effects, and I had the perfect piece of footage to try it with and a brand new 16″ cintiq to test it out on.

The clip I wanted to use was an outtake from a music shoot, where we had attached a go-pro to the head of the guitar.

So I did the rough layer then a refined layer in TV Paint, which looked quite nice all by itself (see below)

linework

linework

Then I drew the strings in on a different layer, witnessing some amazing bending of the strings as I went through it!

These were the only layers I decided to draw in TVP as I wanted to take more time to play in After Effects.

In After Effects I wanted to see if I could get some interaction going between the TVP layers and filters/effects available in AE, I also scaled and repeated layers to add more visual cues from the music.

I really liked the way it ended up and using the larger cintiq was a joy!

 

Animation – green screen

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Working at NUA as the Animation and sound technician, this week’s process test was to go through greenscreen, from beginning to end.

Through this I would be able to test out the new dragonframe to see what features had been updated, and perhaps changed, to make sure that I am always up-to-date.

To also ensure that my green screen setup was as good as possible for an upcoming project with the first years, and then brush-up on using After Effects for the post production.

So I grabbed one of our walkcycle armatures, borrowed some doll’s clothes from my children and went into the depths on Animation Studio 1.

destinedforstardom

Destined for stardom!

The key points for green screen are to light the background and foreground almost separately, obviously in the reduced space of an animation studio this is a little more difficult as you can’t get a lot of space in between but, starting with the two basic lights, a flo-light (floodlight) and a kick light to pick out the model from the background, that’s a good place to start.

Green1

A flo-light (floodlight) at the top to try and light the background evenly, then two dedolights and a kick from the back to try and distinguish foreground from background

As you can see the result has harsh lights from the spot, which you need, but adding diffusion will soften the harsh shadows, because we want as little of those as possible.

diffuser

The fabulous dedolights let you easily attach some diffusion material (or gels) directly onto the barn doors with an easy to use tiny clamp

This lessened the shadows and gave me a result I was fairly happy with, although in an ideal world the Green screen would have maybe 2 flo-lights on, to be more even.

Greenwithdiffuse

Softer shadows with diffusion, but I did have to tun up the dedolight a little to compensate

Ready to film, I then turned to the new dragonframe, and to be honest there’s not a lot of difference from version 3, the interface is slightly smarter, but for the students, it will mean an easy transition to the latest version. Which was a must as we had new cameras waiting to be installed, but they would only work with DragonFrame 4. (Canon 1300D’s)

A short jerky walkcycle later – it’s been a while – and I had my character in the middle of the stage, ready to react with a blue polystyrene box that the students have been using, so that my armature (and the action) could stay in the middle.

Disaster fell at this point in the proceedings too…

thegreataccident

ouch!

His ankle joint broke, but as with all good English actors, we carried on!

The resulting video, is not my finest work, the clamp rig is really too big and heavy for this small armature character, there’s a terrible jerk where his ankle breaks , but the reaction works well, and I like the character that the little blue box has… In my head it’s a very lively puppy, that growled to stop my man in his tracks, then once beckoned turns into a slobbering excited mess when he gets a hug and a kiss…

It’s amazing what my imagination adds, now to see if I can add a little post-production magic to help anyone else see it too!

When using DragonFrame, you can either export video or stills, but you must remember to conform your take if you want to discard any re-shot frames, or deleted frames, as when you bring in an image sequence into AE, it can pick up those dud frames.

Also make sure your frame rate is correct, again if you lengthen or hold frames on the Xsheet, you will need to conform your take for those changes to take effect and your image sequence to reflect your timed animation from dragonframe.

Leaving the animation studio behind I headed up to the Media Lab to get started in After Effects.

Once you’ve set up a regular 1080p workspace and composition bringing in an image sequence is really simple, click on your first image and after effects will pick up all of the tiff’s in that folder, in sequence, and ‘pre-comp’ them together as a single piece of media, so for animation from dragonframe, that’s exactly what you want.

Then drag this tiff sequence down onto your pre-set composition timeline, and resize them to fit – this is why you should always setup the comp first, not just plonk your content onto the timeline as it will take it’s size from the media and who knows what size it might end up, which then leads to rendering/processing problems.

I like to use a garbage matte before applying the keylight effect, as it cuts down how much green the effect is trying to process, and with my small setup I knew the corners were going to need taking out. So, although it’s a laborious process I step through all of the frames, altering the mask slightly to allow for model movement. It is lovely when you don’t have to move it for a few frames!

Then I could move onto adding the keylight 1.2 effect… it does a fab job, and this is where you can really see any shortfall in your green screen technique – and there were some very particular areas in this test! The best tips I would give are clipping the black and white points (in the settings area of the effect) and using the alpha preview to see exactly what is black and white. I had a bit of spill both on the box and the white clothing which I couldn’t seem to sort out which left parts of my characters with slightly see-through areas, a bit more subtle tweaking of the advanced settings with the blacks and whites, got it beautifully crisp.

Now to put a simple background in to see how it was all doing.

Et voila, it’s ok, it’s nice to see it in a situation away from green, or black, really good exercise to go  through before the next first years project, dragonframe 4 is still as easy to use and after effects has many different and powerful ways of keying.

To add to the ways stated above, you could also; clone stamp in AE to remove the pins, which I did do a bit, but it makes a crazy amount of layers; Add some 3D lighting to perk up the character; Colour correct the background and animation to make them feel more cohesive; Track eyes/features onto the characters in 3D space and use layers more cleverly to give a sense of perspective.

However what I wanted to do was give my little bluebox puppy a bit of life, but I didn’t want perfect, which would be my normal style, something in Illustrator with beautiful clarity of line, I was after a more Mr Messy feel and although I don’t use it a lot, I knew that TV Paint would get me a really nice organic free feel to it.

So I rendered a low res copy out of AE, and used this for a background layer in TV paint, then got my wacom tablet out and let my imagination go a little wild!

I can practically hear the excited slobbering doggy noises, so at some point, I will return to this project and add some sound…

tbc…

Playful politics in Photoshop

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Couldn’t resist a quick play in photoshop as the image of Theresa May as the ultimate baddy!

TM_WWoE

Kodak Ektra – a perfect match?

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Christmas is coming early!

I have been following the development of this new camera phone from Kodak, and today I got my pre-order notification.

I already have a fantastic camera on my phone (it’s a Sony Z5) but really wanted to check out this innovative and rather cool looking kodak offering.

Pre-ordering gives me the free case, and I chose the natty Tan version, it should arrive by mid-december and I will be giving it a thorough workout as I have started a project cataloguing the seasons in my local park that I just happen to pass through every morning.

eatonpark_tutt3043

https://www.flickr.com/photos/traceytutt/

eatonpark_09

Currently I am employing my Sony Phone or my portable on the go Fuji x30, but I’m always on the lookout for what could be a perfect combination of snapper and phone.

Full specs don’t seem to be out for the kodak, like full physical specs, but the data numbers are in.

Spec Details
Camera 21MP main camera with Kodak non-reflective lens coating. Aperture f2.0.

Optical Image Stabilization and Auto Focus.

13MP front-facing camera.

Phase Detection Auto Focus (PDAF) & HDR Imaging.

4K Video Capture.

Internal Leading Helio X-20 Decacore Processor

3000 mAh battery

3GB RAM

32GB Memory, expandable with MicroSD cards

4K Video Capture.

I will be interested to see how it feels in hand, being quite a bit thicker and I’ve also gleaned that the internal camera may well be the same as my current Sony… watch this space…

ueabroad_11

 

Creative Coding Week 1 & 2 #creativecoding

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Future eLearn have some fantastic free online courses, MOOC’s and I have been immersing myself in their creative coding one at every opportunity. Although I’m a couple of weeks behind the latest modules, because I can take it and learn at any time, I’ll catch up, or just finish at my own pace, therein lies the beauty and flexibility of the concept!

Use computer programming as a creative discipline to generate sounds, images, animations and more, with this free online course.

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/creative-coding

Coding

In the first two weeks I have made my name in a lovely little interactive drawing canvas, see above, and we have been introduced to great interactive and digital artists using processing and creative code within their art.

I am hoping that I can spot a link between these kind of basic interactions and my own interactive sculpture, or artworks, as I still want people to interact and not be passive within galleries or museums.

Daniel Rozin, particularly interests me and one of his latest works is fascinating to watch…

List from the course of artists and designers and researchers in interaction design.

Adventures in Zoetrope Animation

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First things first, remember when you got your mathematics tin set at school and you played with it all and thought I’ll never need this…’ well, if you want to have a go at making a zoetrope you’re going to need to fire up your math student brain, find a compass and remember what pi is!

you will need a compass

you will need a compass…

I am putting together a set of resources for an introduction to animation I will shortly be presenting, in line with the teaching course that I am currently studying for, and I wanted to get the students to create an animation and understand  keyframes, movement and persistence of vision (which means our brains see still images as moving).

Now in the short time I have, they won’t be able to create a full blown animation, so I’ll be guiding them through how to make a real basic staple of animation, a walkcycle, consisting of just 12 frames, running cyclically.

I don’t have a fancy animation rostrum hooked up to a massive projector or anything but need to be able to show the class the results, almost instantly, and I hit on the idea of putting those frames into a zoetrope viewing device, so that they can all have a go and see what happens with the movement they create.

Cutting the base

Cutting the base circle

I’m pretty handy with a scalpel so dug out some foamboard to make the basic structure of the zoetrope itself.

I started with the size of frame I wanted them to draw on becuase I didn’t want it to be too small an area, and then worked backwards, calculating a regular space in between and ended up with a strip 670mm long and 70mm tall.

This is where you need your pi and compass, take the 670 and divide it by pi to get the circumference of the circle you need for the base, divide this in half and set your pair of compasses up to draw your circle and cut!

Admittedly it didn’t quite fit on the first cut, I put this down to the very worn compasses that I managed to eventually find in my daughters room, under some books, but it was larger than needs be so I re-trimmed a slither and it fit!

Zoetrope and base now fitted after a little re-trim

Zoetrope and base now fitted after a little re-trim

Using a thin ribbon of double sided sticky tape around the bottom provided a good snug fit

Using a thin ribbon of double sided sticky tape around the bottom provided a good snug fit

The outside wall I add is 670mm x 140mm, laminated and cut, with the frames and slit marks printed on one side and all black on the outside so I have a register for my animation and a template to cut for the thin viewing holes.

wpid-dsc_0090.jpg

You can see the slit holes have been cut out in this shot

I also needed to work out how to get it to spin, this was something I mulled over and looked at other ways to do it, but I didn’t have any ‘lazy susan’ bearings as one suggested and didn’t like the twizzle it in your hand method often used in other ‘how to’s’ .

Searching for another method I looked around my desk for inspiration and found a DVD case, one of those ones for a 100 discs, with a long spindle, playing with it I discovered that the discs, when spun, quite happily turned and kept moving fairly easily – aha! I had found a really cheap easy option to making my zoetrope spin.

CD stuck to the bottom of the base

CD stuck to the bottom of the base

I stuck one disk to the bottom of the base and added a few padding layers of foam board to bring the height of the zoetrope up…

cutting extra padding discs of foamboard

cutting extra padding discs of foamboard

The extra layers added to the spindle and free turning CD on the top which would spin against the one of the base

The extra layers added to the spindle and free turning CD on the top which would spin against the one of the base

I experimented with having 1 or 2 extra cds underneath, and found that 2 worked best to give a smoother turn.

Finished and in testing with my walkcycle animation

Finished and in testing with my walkcycle animation

All was working, it spun fairly well – I would like to improve this, but cost and time are against me – but the last obstacle was that my line drawn animation just didn’t show up when spun, another 12 frame cycle I had which was solid black shapes worked really well, so out with the felt tips to colour mine in and hey presto… zoetrope resource… done!

Below you’ll find a link to my pdf templates so you can have a go too!

zoetrope template copy

Inital GoPano 360 video tests #360 #gopanomicro

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So, I’ve bought my GoPano micro adaptor (not many left!), conned my husband into ‘needing’ an iphone 5 (just happens to fit the GoPano Micro :)) and shot two pieces of 360 footage, not exciting pieces obviously, just me wandering round my house and outside, but I just needed some test footage to move forward with…

This is a screengrab from the inside shot.

Screengrab from test go pano 360 video shot

Screengrab from test go pano 360 video test shoot

I love that when you’re viewing it online you can turn around and zoom with keyboard controls.

  1. So problems that are easy to spot before I can develop it further are, I’m quite prominent in the frame, and staring at myself is not what I want to do – solution, test different ways of holding the camera and GoPano setup.
  2. Light needs to be good as the phone auto corrects as we move through and it doesn’t cope well with internal lighting.
  3. Finally – quality, is it up to scratch, this can only be really tested when I go a step further and see if I can view this video in my google cardboard VR glasses..

Lastly can I take it into a programme and add interactivity?

What I really want is one where the viewer can drive the movement, similar to Fibrums Rollercoaster where you start the ride by focusing your gaze on the ‘go’ lever within the environment.

A new addition to the recently updated Google Cardboard compatible apps is ‘Titans of Space’

Titans of Space® is a short guided tour of a few planets and stars, the point of which is to give the player a sense of scale of just how big these planets and stars are compared to each other.

In game visual from Titans of Space

In game visual from Titans of Space

Again this uses the mechanic that you have a virtual crosshair and focussing where you are looking, at a trigger will reward you with a reaction in game, very clever stuff..

I would ideally be able to wander around the created environment just by turning my head and opening doors or entering corridors with this virtual crosshair as my controller.

So I need to trial different capture methods to minimise my presence in the resulting video and test the video from gopano site with google Cardboard to see if it’s compatible… will report back soon!

Creating 360 Video – on a budget? #360video

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Since making my own Google Cardboard I have been looking at how I can put my own content into it.

My DIY google cardboard

My DIY google cardboard

The easiest and quickest way is to take a full 360 panorama photo (known as a photosphere) using the Google Camera app, which appears automatically if you have a google device, or can now be downloaded from the app store onto any android device.

Google Camera App Screenshot

Google Camera App Screenshot

This is a really quick and interesting image to view in the Google Cardboard viewer, you select it from the list when you turn the google cardboard app on, it then takes you straight through to your last photosphere image.

It’s very eerie viewing a fully immersive scene – and it really works well – when not in that particular place. The first shot I took was of my office and when I viewed it back on different occasions found it quite disorientating as the day I shot it, it was sunny, so to put myself into that moment on a cloudy day, and it to be so lifelike, when you ‘came out’ of it, it was quite impressive.

360 panosphere in my office

360 photosphere in my office

It’s not perfect, I actually have two computers and screens on my desk, but because of the limitations of the camera/app/360 capability, it appears I only have one as a portion has been overlapped so much, but, on the whole, it really puts you there, in the other space. The google cardboard photo viewer automatically works out the side by side bi-ocular view and the refresh rate when turning round is practically real time, I didn’t notice any lag whatsoever.

When I showed this to my children (my testers for anything), they thought it was great and wanted to take photospheres in every room, so that they could sit in a different room and view the other room… I 360’d our kitchen and they then wanted to show all their friends that they could be ‘in the kitchen’ whilst anywhere else in the house. Great fun.

It’s very effective, but, I want to do 360 video.

S0, investigating this and I come across a wonderful app (to be used with google cardboard) made by a very clever company called Jaunt, featuring a song with Paul McCartney where not only have they produced 360 video which you can look all around, but the sound is also 360… Put on a good pair of headphones, download this app and see the future of music videos!

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.jauntvr.preview.mccartney&hl=en_GB

But how would I replicate this, on a budget and without access to the latest gizmos…?

Go Pano produce a large and expensive option of a lens add on to a pro camera, costing $500, but, I have found they also do a micro version for just $29, which a uk company sell for £24 (http://www.red-door.co.uk/pages/productpages/gopano-micro-iphone.html) which is a great price and will help me experiment, but it will only fit onto an iPhone 4, 4s and 5, which I don’t have and seems to be no update for, so leads me to believe it’s not very good or not very popular, so I’d need to get my hands on a phone pretty soon to trial it.

Fortunately from their purchase page they have a link to users own uploaded 360 videos, this one was my favourite http://www.gopano.com/video/MTM2NzI these guys have so much energy and are really having fun with the 360 video and because it’s in a fixed position it works well, this video of a walkaround behind the scenes of a red bull bike day, shows the problem with holding the device, http://www.gopano.com/video/MjE1MDk, look behind you and there’s a giant arm! One more video which shows a shortcoming of this lovely little device, which has big ideas, but I’m not sure the output is up to high quality standard, is an acoustic music piece, and if you look around you can very clearly see dirty marks, or dinks in the reflective surface, which greatly affects the quality of the video, which also seems a little soft and I’m not sure if that is because the versions of iphone that it works with don’t have great video quality anyway… http://www.gopano.com/video/MjIzNTE

So I could for about £100 get some 360 video, but I would love to make it slightly interactive, such as in the FiBrum VR Rollercoaster, where to make the experience start you have to concentrate your view on a red lever which starts the ride.

Fibrum Rollercoaster App Screenshot

Fibrum Rollercoaster App Screenshot

I also don’t know if you can view this type of 360 video in Google Cardboard, this article has some good references

Taken from http://www.chioka.in/tag/google-cardboard/

Devices that can capture (360) degrees panorama:

  • GoPano – A special lens attachable to iPhone that allows you to take panoramas and panoramic videos. It works by having a 360 degree lens and bend the light into the iPhone camera. Works for iPhone only. 360 degrees horizontally only.

  • Kageto – A company manufacturing the Dot, Lucy, and Jo. They are successive versions of a special lens attachable to iPhone or Android to take panoramas and panoramic videos. Similar to GoPano, 360 degrees horizontally only.

  • BubbleScope – Another attachable lens to iPhone for capturing panoramas and panoramic videos. Similar to GoPano, 360 degrees horizontally only.

I need to follow through a few leads from these links, then I need to look at software that can take in 360 degree video and make it interactive and output it in a form that Google Cardboard can use, but it looks like it is possible, this firm make a SDK which, currently, is free to play with, again more reading required in the depths of the small type to see what file types they are compatible with…  http://www.panframe.com/

So yes you can take 360 video – with a small budget – with a few limitations, but good enough to test my proof of concept for interactive live 360 video, when my Go Pano Micro turns up, I’ll report back.

I decided to go for the Go Pano as the video from the Bubblescope looks particularly poor on first glance and the Kogeto seems to be very proprietary and I haven’t been able to find any video to view – as yet. But as an aside, both of these 360 add ons have the attachment flat to the phone, so you cannot get rid of the black box of the phone in the resulting video, see bubblescope still below.

Bubblescope still

Bubblescope still

 

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