Putting the Bustard in it’s place #greatbustard

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The Bustard sculpture is now practically finished… I could probably sand and sand and re plaster indefinitely, but I’ve decided to see how it looks in the space.

Taking it up the stairs is helped by it being light and still in two pieces.

I know the area I’ve been given and have a few options as to which orientation it could be.

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On the right, it’s a good size in the space.

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I borrowed a leftover label from the (now shut) BA show to place on the base to represent the label reproduction from the Norwich Museum…

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I want visitors to lean into the sculpture to try and read the label, thereby triggering the animated projection which will cross the wall…

Looking at the space, I’m wondering if it’s possible to animate over one wall and around the corner to fill the walls a little more…plus now I see the sculpture in the space I realise it’s not going to take long to cover the one wall I originally thought of, purely because I’m working life-size…

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This is what you could see on approach as they are building a wall on the left and another to the right, which the plinth represents…

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So would people just peek in, or would they come into the space. They would need to come through the space to reach the other installation, which makes a bit of a path through ‘my’ area, but I need it triggered.

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on the left

 

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wpid-dsc_0029.jpgThis side could make people look around the edge wall and then just move on, I can obviously mark up the mat with ‘step on me’ or similar, but it would be nice if it was a bit more unexpected and natural.

I need to know whether I’m getting a false flat wall put in on either existing wall, or if I have to deal with the sockets and radiator and door with glass window in.

The space left behind from the right hand side new walls makes a lovely corner space, with handy plug sockets for my Augmented reality plinth, but totally bisected because of foot traffic through it…

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On the other hand, plenty of the spaces I saw on the BA show you had to walk through, so maybe I shouldn’t worry.

I could maybe ask for the entrance to the 2nd installation to be at the other end, but that would leave a scarily big space!

The one thing I definitely do not notice when it is place inside the space, are any lump, bumps or plaster imperfections, that I have been a little obsessed with working with it close up in the 3D workshop.

It’s decided, no more sanding, move onto the next bit…

 

 

 

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Great Bustard sculpture, looking good

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Update on the ongoing sculpture, just the sanding to go and it’s making a real difference.

 

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Before and after of the sides.

Sanding takes the lumps out beautifully.

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Looking at the model on his legs and I am still thinking about whether to snip the long ‘h’ support bar down, or to dig into the sculpture underneath so that the support bar doesn’t show at all..

When viewed from my height it’s fine, but if you look underneath or are just a bit shorter you can see the metal prongs…

It’s balanced very well, is still light enough and looks great, I can’t wait to put it in situ and test some projection onto it.

Tail End #greatbustard #sculpture

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I know I only have a half day in the workshop to day so decide to focus on getting the tail covered and as smooth as possible, unlike the head which is disappointing.

After the success of the back of the bird yesterday I work harder and with more water into the dipped area which would be the space between the feathers on a real bustard but is more like a gentle dip on my sculpture.

It takes such a long time, but the results do come and I work a few strips from the centre to the outside with the forethought that when I move onto the outer tail feathers I will bring the strips over the top and on top of these.

It takes a lot of modroc just to do the inner dip and I have to buy another kilogram for me to continue onto the sides.

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I work methodically along the tail, doing two sections at a time and cutting the modroc to the right size, this works really well and I get a lovely smooth finish on the feather sections, if only I could have achieved this over the head!

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Eventually the tail is completely covered and looking good.

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I cannot resist putting the body onto the legs and having an overall visual check.

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It’s looking better and better all the time, it still seems to balance well and of course will dry and lose a little more weight, although the wings are yet to be plastered.
As the workshop shuts at 12.30 on a Friday I need to jiggle work to get myself two more half days, hoping to finish the sides in half a day each.

At this point I decide it will be best if the sculpture stays in two pieces until the week before the show, I might even see if I can manufacture it in two parts that perfectly fit together so that it can be easily transported after my show as well.

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This birds got legs aka the Bustard stands again…

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Day 3 in the workshop carving my bustard sculpture as I arrive in the morning, the first thing to check is how well the pieces have stuck together… Unfortunately it looks like the glue really hasn’t had time to set overnight, on the main body and where the head and tail attach…I can’t afford to lose anytime at all just sitting around waiting for the glue to go off, so I strap up the body with a belt and decide not to touch the head or tail for as long as possible.

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I use the big saw sparingly as it vibrates the whole structure, and instead use my trusty Japanese rasp, which is a beautifully constructed thing…

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I work steadily through the sides to bring them in a little as my Bustard was looking too round past the widest point.

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I quite like the rough marks left by the edge of the rasp, almost imitating feather edges.

I start to work on the head, gingerly and then I get a big shock as the head join comes apart and the head almost flips back on itself… this is not what I need to happen at this point, I can’t make glue dry quicker!

Making sure I am even more gentle and keep even pressure on the top of the head, I carry on, dreading that happening again.

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I manage to get a good Great Bustard head shape carved, they have quite angular features and no more scary flip top heads, but it’s the glue, it’s still not dried!

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After lunch I move onto the tail, I know full well this is still a wet join as the two parts were sliding a bit and I had to turn it back round as the middle was not matching up with the centre piece on the tail, but gently and slowly work my way round the outside.

wpid-dsc_0163.jpgit’s looking quite good, I’ve trimmed the sides, shaped the head, managed to smooth the tail and get the shape right, but I’d like to cut into the tailpiece, rather than have it solid. I decide to cocktail stick the two parts together in the hope it might help and start to cut into the very centre of the tail.

In a real birds tail like this it would only be a couple of feathers thick, obviously working with this polystyrene I cannot make it that thin, it will just tear or break, so I try to mimic the outer shape at least to give a hint of the real tail.

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And that’s about it for carving.

I have thoroughly enjoyed it and have now found a reason to have big shoulders…carving! The best work out for your upper arms you’ll ever have, 3 days solid of sawing, cutting, pressing and rasping.

But no time to stop and admire my handiwork, I need to get the steel armature done so I can start scrimming the shape with plaster tomorrow.

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Using a giant set of bolt croppers I cut my steel to length, for both legs, the 3 toes and the base platform to affix it too.

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Jim welds the base for me and we tack the legs on and then put the sculpture on top of the steel for the first time, it looks great, it actually transforms it!

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I am really pleased with how it looks, I’m just completely knackered! With me in the picture you can see for the first time, just how big the sculpture is when standing. It measures at just over the 105cm mark, but the feet and the base probably take up that extra 5cm, so it’s all good…

So I can get going straight away on the plaster work, I need to get a mesh onto the base, so the plaster has something to sit on, and my Bustard has something to stand on.

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Chicken wire does a grand job, even though I get scratched to heck and bleed over my metalwork,  we add on the cradle at the top and another strut on each leg in anticipation of the extra weight the plaster will bring and I manage to get it all attached in time… But then I remember we haven’t put the toes for the feet on…

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I know what the first job tomorrow is going to be!

 

 

Making my very own Great Bustard #greatbustard

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Today started my week devoted to the sculpture making part of my Masters Installation. I’ve been working on some measurements and have the finished workup ready to go. I have already been donated 5 sheets of polystyrene from a BA student who had finished all of his work and no longer needed the extra sheets he’d bought, but when Jim and I measured up, it struck me that the Bustard was looking absolutely massive and I had nowhere near enough poly to make the barrel chest of the bird. So I dashed off to B&Q to buy another 4 sheets, which I then dropped back at College, before going back home and revisiting my original measurements. Good job I did as I had the Bustard 1.2metres at it’s tallest when it’s only 105cm! The same information also had the body length at 115cm, but this was way too long. So with my new designs I returned into college for an afternoon of polystyrene sawing! BustardScupt_measurements-04First I marked out the biggest shape, that being the oval of the body which would be the biggest section, I would need to add on the head and the tail to fit in the pieces of poly I was working on…

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In hindsight, maybe I should have put as much as possible onto the sheet, ie, moved the shape to the bottom to have more neck and tail and just finish with small top sections, but it’s cut now…

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This is the first one cut, not too bad, the bread knife gives quite a good edge, makes it easy to follow the outline although it’s always going to be a bit messy with polystyrene!

So I just need to make 8 of those…

Cutting the polystyrene is quite hard work for my little arm and at one point I wasn’t quite sure I’d be able to get through 8 sheets, let alone all the other bits as well… It does take a considerable amount of time to cut the first 4, but then I find a little work groove and by the end I’m finishing them in 10 minutes a sheet.

So I have my 8 body sections and from the left over pieces of sheet I need to make best use of size to fit the tail and the head within the remaining poly.

A little bit of maths later and I’m marking out the head outline.

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I only need 4 sheets of this as the head/neck isn’t as wide as the body (about half – 20cm max)

I’m racing against time to get these 4 cut out as I need to get them glued before they close the workshop…

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Fortunately Jim helps me sandwich all the layers together and glues them with some strong wood glue and a few cocktail sticks for extra holding whilst they set.

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8 bodies, 4 heads, done.

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Jim checks out the right kind of rasp on a side section, so that I can immediately start when I get in tomorrow… But first I’ll need to cut 6 tail sections and get them gluing and then I can start sculpting.

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It really is going to be massive, the sculpture will stand just over a metre tall and is nearly a metre in length at it’s widest point (crop to tail), I can’t wait to get the sections together, this will (hopefully) be impressive… and it gives me a nice big surface to project onto 🙂