Being able to leave the sculpture over a couple of days to really dry off is helpful, but the problems I face getting a reasonably smooth surface are quite apparent now it’s dried.

wpid-dsc_0242.jpg

wpid-dsc_0240.jpg

wpid-dsc_0248.jpg

wpid-dsc_0244.jpg

wpid-dsc_0247.jpgThe head and neck area are the worst affected, and the photos of the face above are after I have spent a whole morning using sandpaper on the lumpiest bits, but this in turn brings out the fluff of the bandage, a real downside to the modroc sculpting method. If you don’t get it smooth on application, then sanding it reveals the material. Rather than if I had applied traditional plaster I would have been able to sand it as much as I liked (well down to the polystyrene former). But of course that would have made the model an awful lot heavier and the thicker skin would have impacted on my original carving.

My next step will be to apply another layer of modroc, but at the same time a skim of plaster, trying to work a smooth surface as I go, understanding a little more of how the modroc works. I will need to apply the regular plaster skim at the same time, so that it adheres to the still damp modroc surface.

I need to make sure I don’t apply too much plaster as this will totally cancel out the benefits and reasons that I used the modroc in the first place…

 

Advertisements